Comorbidity of psychiatric disorders and personality profiles of American World War II prisoners of war

Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease - 1991-04-01Engdahl B, Speed N, Eberly RE, Schwartz J10.1097/00005053-199104000-00001
Examined the psychiatric comorbidity and personality characteristics of 62 World War II prisoners of war (POWs). This study extends the previous findings of N. Speed et al (see record 1989-26181-001). Each former POW completed the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Lifetime Version (SADS-L), a
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

A complex psychiatric syndrome that develops in response to trauma exposure. Individuals with PTSD experience intrusive recollections or reexperiencing of the traumatic event, avoidance of trauma reminders, emotional numbing, and hyperarousal. In addition, PTSD is associated with high rates of concomitant physical and mental health problems, increased health care use, and impairment in social and occupational functioning. Almost 7% of the general population and up to 30% of veterans meet lifetime criteria for PTSD. Indeed, PTSD is one of the most common psychiatric disorders, representing a significant and costly public health concern.
symptom severity scale based on criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III) and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). The Ss displayed a remarkable frequency of comorbid psychiatric disorders and a current adjustment characterized by traits of depression, anxiety, and somatization. Only 19% were free from all SADS-L lifetime psychiatric diagnoses, and only 9 had MMPI profiles within "normal limits." The amount of comorbidity of
PTSD

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

A complex psychiatric syndrome that develops in response to trauma exposure. Individuals with PTSD experience intrusive recollections or reexperiencing of the traumatic event, avoidance of trauma reminders, emotional numbing, and hyperarousal. In addition, PTSD is associated with high rates of concomitant physical and mental health problems, increased health care use, and impairment in social and occupational functioning. Almost 7% of the general population and up to 30% of veterans meet lifetime criteria for PTSD. Indeed, PTSD is one of the most common psychiatric disorders, representing a significant and costly public health concern.
and depression 40 yrs after captivity was also remarkable. Findings support the hypothesis that depression is a late manifestation of being chronically ill with
PTSD

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

A complex psychiatric syndrome that develops in response to trauma exposure. Individuals with PTSD experience intrusive recollections or reexperiencing of the traumatic event, avoidance of trauma reminders, emotional numbing, and hyperarousal. In addition, PTSD is associated with high rates of concomitant physical and mental health problems, increased health care use, and impairment in social and occupational functioning. Almost 7% of the general population and up to 30% of veterans meet lifetime criteria for PTSD. Indeed, PTSD is one of the most common psychiatric disorders, representing a significant and costly public health concern.
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