Reply to Kurtzer and Herter

Our paper (Naselaris et al. 2006) examined statistically-in great detail-the distribution of a large number (>1,000) of preferred directions calculated from firing rates during free, unconstrained reaching movements in three-dimensional (3D) space. The enriched representation of forward (and to a lesser degree backward) reaching confers an obvious behavioral advantage and, very probably, is conferred on by the high frequency of occurrence of such movements in everyday life. A wealth of information from other studies, cited and discussed in our paper, supports this interpretation. All of this evidence notwithstanding, Kurtzer and Herter contend that a previous paper by Scott et al. (2001) offers the correct interpretation. ...